Regional council president accuses Heritage New Zealand of “focusing on the 1930s”

Heritage New Zealand opposes “daring and intrusive” Snapper payment machines planned for Wellington station.  (Conceptual drawing)

METLINK / Tips

Heritage New Zealand opposes “daring and intrusive” Snapper payment machines planned for Wellington station. (Conceptual drawing)

Greater Wellington Regional Council chairman Daran Ponter accused Heritage New Zealand of “focusing on the 1930s” after opposing the design of new Snapper machines planned for Wellington station.

The six card validation machines are needed as part of a trial of the Snapper payment system on Wellington’s Johnsonville train line from November.

Official information documents provided to Thing show Heritage New Zealand has been in discussions with city council about installing the machines since December last year, raising concerns about their “daring and intrusive” design.

“It’s ironic that at a time when Metlink is trying to implement a modern ticketing system, Heritage NZ is focusing on the 1930s,” Ponter said.

Greater Wellington Regional Council President Daran Ponter accused Heritage New Zealand of

Rosa Woods / Stuff

Greater Wellington Regional Council President Daran Ponter accused Heritage New Zealand of “focusing on the 1930s”. (File photo)

READ MORE:
* Heritage NZ opposes the “bold and intrusive” design of the Snapper machines planned for Wellington station
* Metlink will remove cash payments from some bus services
* Coronavirus: honesty is the new policy against the virus in public transport

“We are modernizing the rail system. Part of this is ensuring that commuters have access to a fully integrated ticketing system and have consistent Metlink brand orientation information. “

Ponter said the planned trial was now on a “critical path” as the board needed urgent approval for the machines from Heritage New Zealand so the project could start on time.

“If they don’t grant it within a month, there is a significant risk of delay for the project.”

All six card validation machines are required for a test run on the Johnsonville railroad.  (Conceptual drawing)

METLINK

All six card validation machines are required for a test run on the Johnsonville railroad. (Conceptual drawing)

The heritage Category 1 station, which opened in 1937, is owned by KiwiRail. The board needs approval from Heritage New Zealand to make any changes.

Heritage New Zealand’s concerns about the machines relate primarily to their “intrusive” nature and the “bold” colors on offer.

He said in a statement Thursday that he was aware of the critical moment of the project and that he had given KiwiRail its formal support in the lawsuit.

The station and platforms classified as category 1 heritage belong to KiwiRail.  (File photo)

MONIQUE FORD / Stuff

The station and platforms classified as category 1 heritage belong to KiwiRail. (File photo)

She was still in discussion with regional and municipal councils and an independent heritage consultant on machine design.

“Heritage New Zealand is pleased to be included in [the discussions] and will continue to offer advice through this cooperative forum.

The entity said it agreed with the consultants involved in the project that the design should be “as neat and tidy as possible to avoid clutter while still allowing efficient use.”

“We are convinced that it can be achieved. “

Temporary machines are expected to be replaced by permanent ones in 2023, as part of an integrated ticketing system planned nationwide.

The ticketing provider for this service has not yet been determined.

Elna M. Lemons